Toxic Gas Detection Articles

New S4000TH Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Detector with HART® Communication

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is a common product of the decomposition of dead plant and animal material. Man-made releases of H2S into the air result primarily from the production and refining of oil and natural gas as well as wastewater treatment, pulp and paper manufacturing, and food processing.

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SIL Suitable Toxic Gas Detection

In support of its commitment to workplace safety, General Monitors is pleased to announce that its TS4000 and TS400 Toxic Gas Detector product lines are now both rated SIL 2 suitable. Process and plant engineers in hazardous industries now have a complete suite of toxic gas, combustible gas and flame monitoring products available from General Monitors that are rated SIL 2 or 3 suitable.

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H2S Gas Detection: What's Important to Know

If you think your nose and a pair of fast running shoes will protect you from the dangers of H2S on the job, you could be dead wrong in a hurry. That rotten egg smell that comes from Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas can be quickly over-powering and immobilizing in less than a minute. In the worst situations, you'll have precious little time to recognize the danger and even make the right decision to flee a contaminated work area. That's why General Monitors continues to provide the industry's most advanced line of reliable fixed H2S gas detectors, including detectors for SIL Suitable applications.

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Carbon Monoxide and Confined Space Dangers

Winter is the time of year that we frequently hear news about tragic carbon monoxide (CO) accidents in the home and the need for home CO monitors. These devices can be real life-savers at home and could prevent many unnecessary close-calls, hospitalizations and deaths. If you don’t have a CO monitor in your home -- don’t wait any longer! CO is also a dangerous workplace hazard in many industrial plant environments. When you combine CO with confined spaces there is a high probability that the results will be deadly. CO is an odorless, colorless, toxic gas that can cause sudden illness or death due to asphyxiation. CO is also flammable within certain concentrations.

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Protection Against the Hazards of Sulfur Dioxide

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a colorless gas with a characteristic, irritating, pungent odor that is also liquid when below 14°F for many industrial applications. It reacts with water to form sulfurous acid and is highly dangerous in this state. Accidental exposure to sulfur dioxide in the workplace can have severe and life-threatening consequences if workers are not warned about the unexpected presence of this dangerous gas.

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Oxygen Deficiency: The Silent Killer
Injury or death due to oxygen deficiency is a common hazard in many chemical, refinery and other industries. Toxic gas is often to blame when workers die unnecessarily due to asphyxiation in environments where the oxygen is actually depleted by gases such as nitrogen. To prevent these accidents, OSHA, NIOSH and other federal/state agencies have implemented numerous regulations, required procedures, permit processes -- as well as providing extensive preventative educational literature and announcing major enforcement actions.

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H2S: That Rotten Egg Smell Is Life Threatening
Almost everyone has experienced that unpleasant rotten egg smell that comes from Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas, but it is generally not a serious health problem when we’re traveling briefly near a dairy, poultry farm or wastewater treatment plant. The exposure level is low and short, but it should never be ignored because it can be fatal.

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Next-Generation Toxic Gas Detection Systems
Toxic gas leaks at processing plants pose a danger in many industries, including chemical, oil/gas, electric utilities, food & beverage, pharmaceutical, pulp/paper, and wastewater treatment. Leak sources typically include pipelines, valves, tanks, burners, freezers, separators, flare systems, aeration ponds and other equipment. The distributed nature of equipment within large facilities with complex processes often makes traditional point-monitoring gas detectors either ineffective or cost prohibitive by themselves.

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Avoiding Major Chlorine Accidents in Water Treatment and Other Applications
It only takes a 0.75 second chlorine leak to require a safety report. Did you know that in the majority of all chlorine leak incidents, major consequences could have been avoided by quickly shutting off the chlorine supply at the tank valve?

Chlorine is found in many processes, including those used to purify water and treat wastewater, as well as processes to make plastics, vinyl and nylon. You’ll find chlorine supports the manufacture of gasoline additives, brake fluid and antifreeze, as well as popular metals such as titanium, magnesium and aluminum.

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Wastewater and Other Toxic Hazards In The Food Industry

Producing high-quality, sanitary food, fruits, vegetables, beverages, dairy and meat items often requires the use of equipment and processes that may involve toxic and combustible gases. The danger that these gases pose is not always obvious. Water is an excellent example.

The raw processing of fruits, vegetables and dairy products, as well as meats, requires the use of water. Water is harmless -- right? Some of these food processes, however, require large amounts of water. After the water is used in the primary food process, it must be disposed of or treated for re-use.

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New Toxic Gas Detection Products
After surveying process engineers about their emerging application needs for fixed toxic gas detectors, General Monitors has developed a next-generation total toxic monitoring solution with the new TS4000 Toxic Gas Detector. The advanced TS4000 Toxic Gas Detector combines highly reliable electrochemical cell sensors with intelligent microprocessor technology and innovative packaging to provide superior performance, exceptional ease-of-use and lowest total life-cycle costs.

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Ammonia Hazards In Refrigeration
Anhydrous Ammonia (NH3) is commonly used as a coolant in large industrial refrigeration systems. While ammonia refrigeration has long been a standard in the food/beverage industry, it is also now found in pharmaceuticals production, in air-conditioning equipment for some public buildings and in electric power generation plants. Ammonia is a toxic gas, though, and the proper safety monitoring procedures and equipment must be in place at all times to avoid serious accidental injury or death.

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Oxygen Deficiency Is A Deadly Hazard
Every year workers in a wide range of industries die unnecessarily due to asphyxiation in oxygen-deficient or other environments filled with toxic gases. To prevent these accidents, OSHA, NIOSH and other federal/state agencies have implemented numerous regulations, required procedures, permit processes—as well as providing extensive preventative educational literature and announcing major enforcement actions.

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Preventing Chlorine Gas Accidents
While you might not realize it, the chemical chlorine and its compounds are part of almost everyone’s daily life. The water you drink, the food you eat, the medicine you take, the clothing you clean, the pool you swim in, the car you drive and thousands of other products are sanitized or manufactured with chlorine.

Chlorine is found in many industrial processes, including those used to make plastics, vinyl and nylon. The electronics industry relies on chlorine in the production of microprocessors and computers. You’ll find chlorine supports the manufacture of gasoline additives, brake fluid and antifreeze, as well as popular metals such as titanium, magnesium and aluminum.

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Preventing Ammonia Gas Accidents
Ammonia (NH3) is a colorless gas that both occurs naturally in the environment and is also man-made for industrial purposes. In nature, bacteria, decaying plants and animals, and animal waste in the soil produce the gas. Ammonia is manufactured by mixing natural gas with steam, which is reformed over a catalyst bed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The hydrogen and nitrogen, from the air, react in a final catalyst bed to produce ammonia gas, which is cooled for tank storage.

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